The Westside Barbell Training Program | The Ultimate Guide!


Westside Barbell Program

The Westside Barbell training program was invented by Louie Simmons in the 1970s. Today it is one of the most popular and effective powerlifting training programs in the world.

If you want to get freaky strong and break powerlifting world records then the Westside Barbell powerlifting program is for you!

Introduction

  • Part 1: The Max Effort Method
  • Part 2: The Dynamic Effort Method
  • Part 3: The Repetition Effort Method
  • Part 4: The Circa-Max Phase
  • Part 5: Sample 12-Week Bench Cycle
  • Part 6: Sample 12-Week Squat / Deadlift Cycle

In this comprehensive guide I will teach you how to break your personal records on the powerlifting platform using the Westside Barbell training program.

The Westside Barbell training program is a high-frequency powerlifting training program invented by Louie Simmons.

Here is a great video of Louie Simmons squatting an Earth-shattering 920 pounds at 53 years old. Check it out:

What an unbelievable squat! Talk about old man strength!

Westside uses conjugate periodization and many other training methods to build the squat, bench press and deadlift.

Conjugate periodization is a way of organizing your training where you train to get bigger, stronger and more explosive all at the same time.

Louie believes that taking time off or using an “offseason” phase is a waste of time! He says that if you take time off then you are going backwards. A better approach is to be at 100% year-round.

Here is Louie Simmons himself describing the benefits of the Westside Barbell training program and conjugate periodization:

So how does the Westside Barbell powerlifting club train heavy year-round without burning out? The secret is they rotate between “heavy” and “light” training days.

The Westside Barbell training program uses a simple 4-day upper body / lower body training split.

You have 2 days where you train the bench press and 2 days where you train the squat and deadlift. Check it out:

The Westside Barbell Training Split

  • Sunday: Dynamic effort bench press
  • Monday: Max effort squat / deadlift
  • Wednesday: Max effort bench press
  • Friday: Dynamic effort squat / deadlift

As you can see there are 2 max effort workouts and 2 dynamic effort workouts. These workouts are both very important. However, they are used for completely different reasons.

The max effort workouts are all about building maximum strength and learning how to strain against heavy weights. Louie Simmons has his athletes work up to a 1-rep max on some type of special exercise for the squat, bench press or deadlift.

The dynamic effort workouts are completely different: they are all about lifting lighter weights as explosively as possible. Louie Simmons likes his athletes to perform 6-12 speed sets where you lift a moderately heavy weight as fast as possible.

At the end of your workouts you should perform 3-5 accessory exercises using the repetition effort method. Your goal is to perform sets in the 5-20 rep range to build muscle mass and work capacity.

Here is the Westside guru Matt Wenning giving a perfect overview of these three training methods:

Now let’s look at some typical Westside Barbell workouts. Check it out:

The Westside Barbell Bench Press Day

  • Exercise #1: Max effort or dynamic effort bench press
  • Exercise #2: Bench press supplementary exercise
  • Exercise #3: Triceps accessory exercise
  • Exercise #4: Lats accessory exercise
  • Exercise #5: Delts accessory exercise

A typical Westside Barbell bench press workout has about 5 different exercises.

First you perform the max effort or dynamic effort bench press. Then you perform a bench press supplementary exercise.

This is a big compound exercise that is similar to the bench press like a board press or a reverse band bench press.

Finally you perform 3 accessory exercises for the triceps, lats and delts. These are smaller exercises and are usually performed for sets of 8-20 reps.

Now let’s look at a typical Westside Barbell squat / deadlift workout. Check it out:

The Westside Barbell Squat / Deadlift Day

  • Exercise #1: Max effort or dynamic effort squat / deadlift
  • Exercise #2: Squat / deadlift supplementary exercise
  • Exercise #3: Posterior chain accessory exercise
  • Exercise #4: Posterior chain accessory exercise
  • Exercise #5: Posterior chain accessory exercise

For the lower body workouts you always start with the max effort or dynamic effort squat / deadlift.

Next you perform a squat / deadlift supplementary exercise. This can be any type of squat, deadlift or good morning like the rack pull against bands or the chain suspended good morning.

Finally you perform 2-3 assistance exercises for the posterior chain. The posterior chain is a fancy name for the hamstrings, glutes and lower back. Some great posterior chain exercises include the glute ham raise and the reverse hyperextension machine.

I hope you found this overview. Now let’s take a closer look at the secrets behind the Westside Barbell training program…

Part 1: The Max Effort Method

The max effort method is an advanced training method where you work up to a 1-rep max on a special exercise for the squat, bench press or deadlift.

Louie Simmons believes the max effort method is the best way to build maximal strength. It also teaches you how to strain against heavy weights.

Here is the Westside guru Matt Wenning giving a perfect overview of the max effort method:

With the max effort method you are going to work up to a 1-rep max on a different special exercise every single week.

You are never going to max out on the actual squat, bench press, or deadlift. That will just lead to physical and mental burnout.

Instead you are going to max out on “special exercises.” These are exercises that are slightly different from the competition squat, bench press or deadlift.

For example a box squat, rack pull against bands or safety squat bar good morning would be great choices for your max effort lower body day.

Here are some of the most common max effort exercises used by the Westside Barbell team. Just click on the links to see a sample YouTube video for each exercise!

The Best Max Effort Bench Press Exercises:

Note: all of these exercises can be performed with chains, bands or reverse bands.

One of the most popular max effort bench press exercises is the floor press against chains. Check it out:

The floor press is like a bench press except you are laying down on the ground. This exercise is great for overloading the top half of the bench press because the range of motion is shorter than a regular bench press.

There are many other max effort bench press exercises that you could use. The important thing is to change the exercise each week to avoid training plateaus.

Now let’s look at the best max effort exercises for the squat and deadlift. Check it out:

 The Best Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Exercises:

Note: all of these exercises can be performed with chains, bands or reverse bands.

One of the most popular max effort squat / deadlift exercises is the rack deadlift against bands. Check it out:

The bands add a tremendous amount of tension in the top position of this exercise. If you have never performed a rack deadlift with quadrupled monster-mini bands then you have to give this exercise a shot!

The Westside crew also uses several different specialty bars for squats and good mornings. Some of their favorites are the safety squat bar and the giant cambered bar. Here is where you can buy them:

So how often should you perform a squat, deadlift or good morning on the max effort lower body day? Louie Simmons has changed his mind on this a lot over the years.

Back in the 1980s and 1990s Louie would have his athletes max out on some sort of good morning about 70% of the time.

He felt that the good morning was the best exercise to develop the maximal strength needed in the hamstrings, glutes, and lower back. He also felt that deadlifting heavy too frequently would hinder his athletes’ progress.

There was just one problem: the Westside Barbell athletes were weak on the deadlift. They had huge squats and bench presses but their deadlifts lagged behind.

In the early 2000s Louie decided to attack this problem directly.

He told his athletes to start maxing out on the deadlift once every 2 weeks. This was in addition to the speed deadlifts they performed every week. Check it out:

Westside Barbell Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Schedule

  • Week #1: Deadlift variation
  • Week #2: Box squat variation
  • Week #3: Deadlift variation
  • Week #4: Good morning variation

This is the modern Westside Barbell approach to max effort exercises.

Keep in mind Louie Simmons is always experimenting. The only people who really know what Louie is doing are training at Westside Barbell in Columbus, Ohio right now!

Part 2: The Dynamic Effort Method

The dynamic effort method is one of the most important parts of the Westside Barbell training program.

Louie Simmons started using it in his program because he could not recover from 2 max effort workouts per week. When he alternated back and forth between max effort and dynamic effort workouts he was able to make progress again.

The dynamic effort method is all about lifting lighter weights as explosively as possible. Here is what speed sets on the bench press should look like:

The powerlifter is lifting the weight as fast as he can on every single rep. This is what you want! The truth is the dynamic effort method has several advantages for the serious powerlifter:

The Dynamic Effort Method Advantages

  • Advantage #1: Increased explosive strength
  • Advantage #2: Increased maximal strength
  • Advantage #3: Improved exercise technique
  • Advantage #4: Improved work capacity

One of the big advantages of the dynamic effort method is it improves your rate of force development.

This is another way of saying it makes you more explosive. This is important because the strongest lifters are almost always the most explosive lifters.

The more explosive you are the easier it is to blast through your sticking points on the squat, bench press or deadlift.

The Dynamic Effort Bench Press

For the dynamic effort bench press you are going to perform 8-10 sets of 3 reps with 60 seconds rest between sets. Louie Simmons believes 3 reps per set is best because it mimics the amount of time it takes to perform the bench press in competition.

Louie Simmons says that you should perform your sets with 50-70% of your 1-rep max. These training percentages could be even lower if you use bands or chains on the bar.

The training percentages aren’t super important. The most important thing is that you explode the weight up on every rep. If the weights aren’t moving fast then it’s too heavy!

Here is what your dynamic effort bench press sets should look like:

Drive! Drive! Drive!

The Westside Barbell training program uses a 3-week wave for the dynamic effort bench press workouts. For example you could use 60% of your 1-rep max for the first workout, 65% of your 1-rep max for the second workout and 70% of your 1-rep max for the third workout.

Here are some sample 3-week waves that you could use:

Bench Press With Straight Weight

  • Week #1: 10 sets of 3 reps @ 60% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #2: 10 sets of 3 reps @ 65% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #3: 10 sets of 3 reps @ 70% of your 1-rep max

Bench Press With Chains

  • Week #1: 10 sets of 3 reps @ 50% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #2: 10 sets of 3 reps @ 55% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #3: 10 sets of 3 reps @ 60% of your 1-rep max

Bench Press With Bands

  • Week #1: 10 sets of 3 reps @ 40% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #2: 10 sets of 3 reps @ 45% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #3: 10 sets of 3 reps @ 50% of your 1-rep max

Louie Simmons really likes to use chains and bands on his dynamic effort bench press workouts. Sometimes he uses both chains and bands on the bar at the same time!

These tools teach you to explode the weight up to lockout and make your workouts that much more effective.

The Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift

Louie Simmons says that Friday is the most important training day on the Westside Barbell training program. This is the day you train the dynamic effort squat and deadlift.

Here is what your dynamic effort squats should look like:

Louie generally recommends using 50-70% of your 1-rep max for your speed squat sets. If you are using bands and chains then you would stay closer to the bottom of this range.

Here are some sample 3-week waves:

Dynamic Effort Squat With Straight Weight

  • Week #1: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 60% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #2: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 65% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #3: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 70% of your 1-rep max

Dynamic Effort Squat With Chains

  • Week #1: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 50% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #2: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 55% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #3: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 60% of your 1-rep max

Dynamic Effort Squat With Bands

  • Week #1: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 40% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #2: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 45% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #3: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 50% of your 1-rep max

These percentages are not set in stone. However, they should serve as a very useful starting point. In the fourth week you would lower the weights back down and start a new 3-week wave.

The speed deadlifts are always performed right after the speed squats. There are two main ways that you can perform speed deadlifts: from the floor or in the rack.

The speed deadlifts from the floor are performed for 4-8 sets of singles. Here is a perfect demonstration of the speed deadlift:

You can either use straight weight or bands on these singles. Louie has a strong preference for doing speed deadlifts with bands but either method will work. Check it out:

Dynamic Effort Deadlift With Straight Weight

  • Week #1: 4-8 sets of 1 rep at @ 60% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #2: 4-8 sets of 1 rep at @ 65% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #3: 4-8 sets of 1 rep at @ 70% of your 1-rep max

Dynamic Effort Deadlift With Bands:

  • Week #1: 4-8 sets of 1 rep at @ 40% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #2: 4-8 sets of 1 rep at @ 45% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #3: 4-8 sets of 1 rep at @ 50% of your 1-rep max

This is what Westside Barbell did for speed deadlifts for the 80s, 90s, and even the early 2000s.

However, sometime around the mid-2000’s Louie Simmons began experimenting with speed rack deadlifts performed with heavy band tension.

These bands were quadrupled so that they offered dramatically more tension in the top position vs the bottom position.

Here is what the dynamic effort rack deadlift should look like:

The rack pulls themselves are normally pulled from 2-6 inches off the ground. Pulling from higher than a 6-inch elevation is counterproductive in Louie’s eyes.

Rather than doing single reps Louie had his athletes doing 8-10 sets of 3 reps. This is an absolutely ungodly amount of volume but the Westside crew seems to be thriving on it.

Here is what a typical 3-week wave might look like for the speed rack deadlifts:

Dynamic Effort Rack Deadlift With Bands

  • Week #1: 8-10 sets of 3 reps @ 40% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #2: 8-10 sets of 3 reps @ 45% of your 1-rep max
  • Week #3: 8-10 sets of 3 reps @ 50% of your 1-rep max

Once gain the percentage denotes the total tension (from weights and bands) at the top of the lift. The band tension at the bottom of the lift is obviously far more than 50% of your 1-rep max.

If you are new to the Westside Barbell training program then I recommend you stick to performing your speed deadlifts from the floor for singles.

However, if you are more of an advanced lifter then you may want to experiment with the speed rack pulls for triples. The rack pulls are far more demanding on your recovery system but well worth the effort if you can handle them.

Part 3: The Repetition Effort Method

The repetition effort method is often called the “bodybuilding method.” You are going to perform all of your assistance exercises with higher reps to build muscle mass and strengthen your weak points.

The repetition effort method is used any time you are not using the max effort method or the dynamic effort method. Here is how you would use the repetition effort method on your max effort bench press day:

Max Effort Bench Press Template

  • Exercise #1: Max effort method
  • Exercise #2: Repetition effort method
  • Exercise #3: Repetition effort method
  • Exercise #4: Repetition effort method
  • Exercise #5: Repetition effort method

As you can see the repetition effort method is performed for every single exercise following your primary max effort or dynamic effort exercise for the day. The squat / deadlift days are organized in the exact same way.

The repetition effort method plays an absolutely crucial role in the Westside Barbell training philosophy. Louie has repeatedly stated that about 80% of the work that his athletes perform is with the repetition effort method.

Using the repetition effort method on assistance exercises gives you the chance to target and strengthen your weak muscle groups. This will help you improve your performance on the squat, bench press and deadlift.

So what assistance exercises should you use? That is a great question. Let’s start by talking about the bench press workouts.

Here is how the Westside Barbell powerlifting club organizes their max effort bench press workouts. Check it out:

Westside Barbell Bench Press Workout Template

  • Exercise #1: ME / DE bench press
  • Exercise #2: Chest assistance exercise
  • Exercise #3: Triceps assistance exercise
  • Exercise #4: Upper back assistance exercise
  • Exercise #5: Shoulder assistance exercise

The max effort or dynamic effort bench press is trained first. Then you move onto assistance work for the chest, triceps, upper back and shoulders.

This is how the Westside Barbell powerlifting club organizes most of their bench press workouts in the modern era.

Here is a very normal looking Westside Barbell max effort bench press workout. Check it out:

Here are the exercises from this workout:

Sample Westside Barbell Max Effort Workout

  • Exercise #1: Bench press, 3 sets of 1 rep
  • Exercise #2: Decline DB press, 3 sets of 5-10 reps
  • Exercise #3: JM press, 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Exercise #4: Pendlay row, 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Exercise #5: DB power cleans, 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Exercise #6: Rope cable pushdowns, 3 sets of 10-15 reps

This workout is very similar to our standard bench press workout template. First the Westside crew performs their max effort bench press exercise. Then they move onto their accessory work for the chest, triceps, upper back and shoulders.

Now let’s talk about the best accessory exercises for these different muscle groups.

The Best Chest Accessory Exercises

  • Option #1: High-rep dumbbell presses to failure
  • Option #2: High-rep bench presses to failure
  • Option #3: Bamboo bar bench presses

Louie Simmons is a big fan of high-rep dumbbell presses to failure. You can see the Westside crew training to failure on the decline dumbbell press in the above video.

Louie says that these high-rep sets to failure are great for building muscle mass and maximal strength. In fact Louie tells his athletes to replace the max effort bench press with high-rep dumbbell presses to failure once every 3-4 weeks. Louie does this to prevent overtraining.

Louie has his athletes perform dumbbell presses to failure on the flat, incline and decline angles. He uses everything from the 5-10 rep range to the 20-40 rep range for these dumbbell presses.

Another great option is the Bamboo bar bench press. Check it out:

The bamboo barbell is literally made out of bamboo!  As you perform the bench press the bar bends and the weights wobble all over the place. This forces you to recruit more muscle fibers in your chest, shoulders, triceps and rotator cuff muscles.

I recommend you perform 2-3 sets of 10-40 reps as a chest assistance exercise.

The Best Triceps Accessory Exercises

  • Option #1: JM press
  • Option #2: Rolling dumbbell extensions
  • Option #3: Tate presses
  • Option #4: Bamboo bar skull crushers
  • Option #5: Cable pushdowns
  • Option #6: Overhead cable extensions

Louie Simmons loves all types of lying triceps extensions for training the triceps. He uses many different exercises like JM presses, rolling dumbbell extensions, Tate presses and even bamboo bar skull crushers.

Here is a great video of the JM press:

The JM press is almost a hybrid between a lying triceps extension and a close grip bench press.

First you lower the bar down to your clavicle area. Then you roll your hands back while pushing your elbows up to the ceiling. The bar should be 2 inches above your chin before you press the bar back up to the starting position.

Sometimes Louie Simmons performs heavy lying triceps extensions in the 5-10 rep range. Other times he performs high-rep burnout sets on cable pushdowns or band pushdowns for sets of 50-100 reps.

The important thing is that you train the triceps and train them hard! Louie says they are the key to a big bench press.

The Best Upper Back Accessory Exercises

  • Option #1: Barbell rows
  • Option #2: Seated cable rows
  • Option #3: Machine rows
  • Option #4: Lat pulldowns

Louie Simmons says that rows are the most important upper back exercises for a big bench press. You are bench pressing in a horizontal plane so you want to train the upper back in the same way.

The Westside Barbell powerlifting club uses all types of rows including barbell rows, machine rows and lat pulldowns. Some Westside athletes perform an upper back exercise every single workout – even on their lower body training days!

The Westside crew doesn’t care about lifting super heavy weights on their upper back assistance exercises. They are more concerned about getting in lots of quality high-rep sets to build muscle mass.

The Best Shoulder Accessory Exercises

  • Option #1: Barbell overhead press
  • Option #2: Dumbbell overhead press
  • Option #3: Plate front raises
  • Option #4: Dumbbell lateral raises
  • Option #5: Reverse pec dec
  • Option #5: Dumbbell power cleans

Louie Simmons believes it is important to include some direct shoulder work in your bench press workouts. The shoulders are not as important as the triceps or upper back but you still need to include some direct shoulder exercises.

Some Westside athletes focus on isolation exercises like plate front raises or dumbbell lateral raises. Others include heavier overhead presses in their routine.

This was a favorite of Jim Wendler when he used to train at the Westside Barbell gym.

Now let’s look at the best Westside Barbell squat / deadlift assistance exercises. Here is how you would use the repetition effort method on your max effort squat / deadlift day:

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Template

  • Exercise #1: Max effort method
  • Exercise #2: Repetition effort method
  • Exercise #3: Repetition effort method
  • Exercise #4: Repetition effort method
  • Exercise #5: Repetition effort method

The repetition effort method is used for all of your assistance lifts after the main max effort exercise.

According to Louie Simmons the most important muscle groups to train for a big squat and deadlift are the hamstrings, glutes and lower back.

Together these muscles are known as the “posterior chain” because they are located on the back of your body and they all work together as a team to help you perform the squat and deadlift.

Now let’s look at the best exercises to target each of these muscle groups. Check it out:

The Best Lower Back Accessory Exercises

  • Option #1: The Reverse Hyperextension
  • Option #2: The Back Attack
  • Option #3: The 45 Degree Back Extension
  • Option #4: Cable Pullthroughs

Louie Simmons and the Westside Barbell powerlifting team say that the reverse hyperextension is the best lower back exercise in the world.

Here is a perfect demonstration of the reverse hyperextension machine:

Louie Simmons invented the reverse hyperextension after he broke his back squatting. Louie’s surgeon wanted to fuse his lower back together and said that he would never be able to compete again.

Louie said [email protected] THAT! and invented the reverse hyperextension to rehabilitate his lower back.

The reverse hyperextension is unique because it rehabilitates the lower back AND strengthens it all at the same time.

When your legs swing under you in the bottom position you are increasing the space between your L1-L5 vertebrae and discs. This decompresses your lower back and allows rejuvenating spinal fluid to enter the area.

Louie Simmons absolutely swears by the reverse hyperextension for building strength and staying injury free.

Another lower back exercise that Louie Simmons really likes is called the “back attack.” Check it out:

The back attack is almost like a good morning machine. It is a tremendous piece of equipment for overloading your lower and upper back.

Many powerlifters report that the back attack works their lower back harder than a barbell good morning has less risk of injury.

In the video the Westside athletes are performing the back attack with extra band tension. This makes the exercise much harder at the top of the movement and adds additional eccentric stress throughout the entire range of motion.

The Best Hamstrings Accessory Exercises

Louie Simmons says that the glute ham raise is the #1 exercise for building big, strong hamstrings.

Here is a perfect demonstration of the glute ham raise:

The glute ham raise is unique because it overloads the hamstrings as knee flexors AND as hip extensors. In other words you have to bend your knees and extend your lower back at the same time while performing this exercise.

Many Westside gurus like Dave Tate say that the glute ham raise is the key to bringing up your lagging hamstrings.

Another one of Louie Simmons’ favorite hamstrings exercises is actually the belt squat machine. Check it out:

The belt squat is an extremely interesting piece of equipment. It overloads your hamstrings and glutes without placing compressive forces on your lower back like a regular squat would.

The belt squat is also one of the best exercises for teaching the Westside-style squat where you sit back and maintain vertical shins.

If you have access to this piece of equipment then I highly recommend you use to target your glutes and hamstrings.

Part 4: The Circa-Max Phase

Louie Simmons has his athletes use what he calls the “circa-max phase” to peak for powerlifting competitions. This is essentially a 3-week phase where you go extremely heavy on your dynamic effort squats with tons of band tension.

During this 3-week period you are only going to perform accessory exercises on your max effort day. This is essentially how Louie peaks his lifters’ strength on the back squat.

Here is a good video showing what the circa max squats should look like:

Here is what a typical 3-week circa-max wave might look like for an advanced lifter:

Dynamic Effort Squat

  • Week #1: 47.5% bar weight + 40-45% band weight for 5 sets of 2 reps
  • Week #2: 50% bar weight + 40-45% band weight for 4 sets of 2 reps
  • Week #3: 52.5% bar weight + 40-45% band weight for 3 sets of 2

All of the percentages are based on your previous best competition squat. Week 4 would be your deload week prior to your powerlifting meet and week 5 would be the powerlifting meet itself.

You may also want to go reasonably heavy on your dynamic effort deadlift sets during weeks 1 and 3 to peak your strength on the deadlift for your powerlifting meet.

For example it may be a good idea to work up to 90%+ during week #1 and 95%+  during week #3. Don’t worry, I cover the circa-max phase in more depth in the sample 12-week training routines provided at the end of this article.

Part 5: Sample 12-Week Bench Cycle

Now we’re getting to the good stuff: I’m going to give you a 12-week Westside Barbell training cycle for both the bench press and the squat / deadlift!

A huge part of conjugate periodization is attacking your weak points to drive up your strength. I do not know what your specific weak points are so I have written this as more of a “cookie cutter” program that should work reasonably well for most people.

This training cycle uses different pieces of equipment like chains, bands and the bamboo bar. You don’t have to use these pieces of equipment but they are highly recommended.

Here is where you can buy your Westside equipment:

I am extremely confident that this 12-week program will work AWESOME if you are someone who responds well to this type of periodization.

Here are the bench press workouts:

Week #1

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against bands (shoulder-width grip), 3 x 1**, 2/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Bamboo bar bench press, 2 x 10-15, 2/0/1/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Flat rolling DB extension, 8 x 8, 2/0/X/0, 30 seconds rest
  • D1: Cable pull down (wide / pronated grip), 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Front DB raises, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against chains (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: 4-board press against bands, 2 x 4-6, 2/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead stop skull crusher, 3 x 8-10, 2/1/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Barbell row, 3 x 10-12, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Bent-over rear delt raise (elbows bent), 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 55% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #2

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: 3-board bench press (wide grip), 3 x 1, 3/1/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Bamboo bar bench press, 2 x 10-15, 2/0/1/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Flat rolling DB extension, 8 x 8, 2/0/X/0, 30 seconds rest
  • D1: Cable pull down (wide / pronated grip), 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Front DB raises, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against chains (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: 4-board press against bands, 2 x 4-6, 2/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead stop skull crusher, 3 x 8-10, 2/1/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Barbell row, 3 x 10-12, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Bent-over rear delt raise (elbows bent), 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 60% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #3

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Floor press against chains, 3 x 1, 2/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Bamboo bar bench press, 2 x 10-15, 2/0/1/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Flat rolling DB extension, 8 x 8, 2/0/X/0, 30 seconds rest
  • D1: Cable pull down (wide / pronated grip), 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Front DB raises, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against chains (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: 4-board press against bands, 2 x 4-6, 2/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead stop skull crusher, 3 x 8-10, 2/1/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Barbell row, 3 x 10-12, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Bent-over rear delt raise (elbows bent), 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 65% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #4

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Flat DB press, 3 x 15-25**, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • B1: Flat rolling DB extension, 8 x 8, 2/0/X/0, 30 seconds rest
  • C1: Cable pull down (wide / pronated grip), 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Front DB raises, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**All 3 sets performed to failure using the same weight.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against bands (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: 4-board press against bands, 2 x 4-6, 2/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead stop skull crusher, 3 x 8-10, 2/1/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Barbell row, 3 x 10-12, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Bent-over rear delt raise (elbows bent), 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 60% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #5

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Dead stop bench press (1 inch above the chest, medium grip), 3 x 1, 1/0X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Standing military press (shoulder-width grip), 2 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Decline DB extension, 3 x 10-12, 3/1/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Seated cable rope face pull (with external rotation), 3 x 10-12, 2/0/1/2, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Band pull-apart, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/1/1, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against bands (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Seated half press in rack, 2 x 5, 2/1/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Band pushdown, 3 x 20-25, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Bilateral machine row, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB lateral raise, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 65% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #6

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: 30 degree incline bench press (close grip), 3 x 1, 5/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Standing military press (shoulder-width grip), 2 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Decline DB extension, 3 x 10-12, 3/1/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Seated cable rope face pull (with external rotation), 3 x 10-12, 2/0/1/2, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Band pull-apart, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/1/1, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against bands (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Seated half press in rack, 2 x 5, 2/1/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Band pushdown, 3 x 20-25, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Bilateral machine row, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB lateral raise, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 70% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #7

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press with chains, 3 x 1, 3/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Standing military press (shoulder-width grip), 2 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Decline DB extension, 3 x 10-12, 3/1/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Seated cable rope face pull (with external rotation), 3 x 10-12, 2/0/1/2, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Band pull-apart, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/1/1, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against chains (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Seated half press in rack, 2 x 5, 2/1/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Band pushdown, 3 x 20-25, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Bilateral machine row, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB lateral raise, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 55% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #8

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: 30 degree incline DB press, 3 x 15-25**, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • B1: Decline DB extension, 3 x 10-12, 3/1/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Seated cable rope face pull (with external rotation), 3 x 10-12, 2/0/1/2, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Band pull-apart, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/1/1, 60 seconds rest

**All 3 sets performed to technical failure with the same weight.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against chains (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Seated half press in rack, 2 x 5, 2/1/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Band pushdown, 3 x 20-25, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Bilateral machine row, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB lateral raise, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 60% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #9

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Floor press (medium grip), 3 x 1, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: JM Press, 3 x 5-7, 3/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Tate press, 8 x 8, 2/0/X/0, 30 seconds rest
  • D1: Wide neutral grip pull down, 3 x 10-12, 4/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB external rotations, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/2/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against chains (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: V-bar dips (upright torso), 2 x 5-7, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Overhead rope cable extensions, 3 x 6-8, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: T-bar row, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB hammer curls, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 65% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #10

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: 2-board bench press against bands (close grip), 3 x 1, 3/1/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: JM Press, 3 x 5-7, 3/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Tate press, 8 x 8, 2/0/X/0, 30 seconds rest
  • D1: Wide neutral grip pull down, 3 x 10-12, 4/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB external rotations, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/2/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against bands (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: V-bar dips (upright torso), 2 x 5-7, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Overhead rope cable extensions, 3 x 6-8, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: T-bar row, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB hammer curls, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 60% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #11

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Reverse band bench press, 3 x 1, 2/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: JM Press, 3 x 5-7, 3/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Tate press, 8 x 8, 2/0/X/0, 30 seconds rest
  • D1: Wide neutral grip pull down, 3 x 10-12, 4/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB external rotations, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/2/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against bands (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: V-bar dips (upright torso), 2 x 5-7, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Overhead rope cable extensions, 3 x 6-8, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: T-bar row, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB hammer curls, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 65% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #12

Max Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: 15 degree incline DB press, 3 x 15-25**, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • B1: Tate press, 8 x 8, 2/0/X/0, 30 seconds rest
  • C1: Wide neutral grip pull down, 3 x 10-12, 4/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Seated DB external rotations, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/2/0, 60 seconds rest

**All 3 sets performed to failure with the same weights

Dynamic Effort Bench Day:

  • A1: Bench press against bands (close grip)**, 10 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: V-bar dips (upright torso), 2 x 5-7, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Overhead rope cable extensions, 3 x 6-8, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: T-bar row, 3 x 10-12, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Seated DB hammer curls, 3 x 12-15, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 70% of your 1-rep max at lockout.

Week #13

  • Meet weak / smash your old bench press pr!

Part 6: Sample 12-Week Squat / Deadlift Cycle

Here are the squat and deadlift workouts for your 12-week training cycle.

This program is a little more complicated than the bench press program as I have included the formal “circa-max” phase in the final few weeks.

I recommend you pay close attention to the format of the circa-max weeks so that you can get the most out of this peaking cycle.

This training cycle also uses some classic Westside pieces of equipment including reverse hyperextensions, glute ham raises, belt squats and different specialty bars.

Here is where you can get your own Westside Equipment:

Thees pieces of equipment are not required but Louie Simmons swears by them. They are some of the best tools you can for building a world-class squat or deadlift.

Here is the full 12-week training cycle:

Week #1

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Conventional rack pull against bands (weights elevated 4 inches), 3 x 1, 2/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Safety squat bar good morning to parallel box, 3 x 5, 3/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Dynamic effort straight bar box squat against chains**, 8 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against chains****, 6 x 1, X/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 65% of your 1-rep max at lockout

****Performed with 65% of your 1-rep max at lockout

Week #2

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Parallel box squat with safety squat bar, 3 x 1, 2/1/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Safety squat bar good morning to parallel box, 3 x 5, 3/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Dynamic effort straight bar box squat against chains**, 8 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against chains****, 6 x 1, X/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 70% of your 1-rep max at lockout

****Performed with 70% of your 1-rep max at lockout

Week #3

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: 2 inch deficit deadlift (conventional or sumo), 3 x 1, 2/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Safety squat bar good morning to parallel box, 3 x 5, 3/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Dynamic effort straight bar box squat against chains**, 8 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against chains****, 6 x 1, X/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 75% of your 1-rep max at lockout

****Performed with 75% of your 1-rep max at lockout

Week #4

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Chain suspended good morning, 3 x 5, 2/1/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • B1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Dynamic effort safety squat bar box squat against bands**, 8 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against bands****, 6 x 1, X/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 70% of your 1-rep max at lockout

****Performed with 70% of your 1-rep max at lockout

Week #5

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Deadlift against bands (sumo or deadlift), 3 x 1, 2/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Belt squat 3 x 5-7, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Dynamic effort safety squat bar box squat against bands**, 8 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against bands****, 6 x 1, X/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 75% of your 1-rep max at lockout

****Performed with 75% of your 1-rep max at lockout

Week #6

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Low box squat against bands (medium stance / heels flat), 3 x 1, 4/1/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Belt squat 3 x 5-7, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Dynamic effort safety squat bar box squat against bands**, 8 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against bands****, 6 x 1, X/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 80% of your 1-rep max at lockout

****Performed with 80% of your 1-rep max at lockout

Week #7

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Conventional block pull (weights elevated 6 inches), 3 x 1, 2/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Belt squat 3 x 5-7, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Dynamic effort buffalo bar box squat against chains**, 8 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against chains****, 6 x 1, X/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 60% of your 1-rep max at lockout

****Performed with 60% of your 1-rep max at lockout

Week #8

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Safety squat bar good morning, 3 x 5, 4/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Belt squat 3 x 5-7, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Dynamic effort buffalo bar box squat against chains**, 8 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against chains****, 6 x 1, X/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 65% of your 1-rep max at lockout

****Performed with 65% of your 1-rep max at lockout

Week #9

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: DB walking alternating lunges, 3 x 8-10, 2/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: 90 degree back extension (barbell on back), 3 x 8-10, 2/0/X/2, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Circa-max box squat against bands**, 5 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against bands****, 4 x 1, X/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 47.5% straight weight and 40-45% band tension. Percentages are based off your prior best competition squat.

**Performed with 90% of your best 1-rep max at lockout. Percentages are based off your prior best competition deadlift.

Week #10

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: DB walking alternating lunges, 3 x 8-10, 2/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: 90 degree back extension (barbell on back), 3 x 8-10, 2/0/X/2, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Circa-max box squat against bands**, 4 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against bands****, 4 x 1, X/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 50% straight weight and 40-45% band tension. Percentages are based off your best competition squat.

**Performed with 70% of your best 1-rep max at lockout. Percentages are based off your prior best competition deadlift.

Week #11

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: DB walking alternating lunges, 3 x 8-10, 2/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • B1: 90 degree back extension (barbell on back), 3 x 8-10, 2/0/X/2, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 6-8, 2/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Reverse hyperextension, 3 x 12-15, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed at 90%, 95%, and 100% of your estimated 1-rep max strength for that day.

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • A1: Circa-max box squat against bands**, 4 x 2, 2/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • B1: Dynamic effort deadlift against bands****, 4 x 1, X/0/X/0, 120 seconds rest
  • C1: Reverse hyperextensions, 3 x 8-10, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Glute ham raise, 3 x 10-12, 3/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 52.5% straight weight and 40-45% band tension. Percentages are based off your best competition squat.

**Performed with 95% of your best 1-rep max at lockout. Percentages are based off your prior best competition deadlift.

Week #12

Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • Accessory exercises of your choice performed at 70% of normal weights.

Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift Day:

  • Accessory exercises of your choice performed at 70% of normal weights.

Week #13:

Meet week / smash your old squat / deadlift PRs!

Conclusion

The Westside Barbell training program has stood the test of time as one of the most effective powerlifting training programs ever invented.

Louie Simmons truly is a powerlifting genius and the strength training world owes this man a great deal of gratitude.

If you have ever used bands or chains (among many other training tools) then you are standing on the shoulders of one of the greatest strength coaches that has ever lived.

Louie Simmons shared his genius with the world and helped to raise the collective consciousness of mankind. I hope his incredible story inspires you to do the same.

Here is one one more quote by Louie Simmons to pump you up even more:

“The hardest thing for a human being to do is change. You have to be willing to change.

Dinosaurs didn’t change and they are gone. If the athlete doesn’t change or adjust he is gone.

Thank you for reading and I wish you the best of luck in your strength training journey!

 

Dr. Mike Jansen, PT, DPT

What's going on! My name is Dr. Mike Jansen, I'm the creator of Revolutionary Program Design. If you want to take your training to the next level, then you've come to the right place... My goal is to make RPD the #1 strength training resource available anywhere in the world!

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