The Seth Feroce Back Workout | The Ultimate Guide!


Are you curious how Seth Feroce trains his back? Do you want to know exactly how Seth designs his back workouts to build size and strength? Then you’ve come to the right place.

In this comprehensive guide, you’ll learn the exact workouts that Seth Feroce uses to build his massive upper back.

Seth Feroce trains his back once per week using 4-6 different exercises and many different high-intensity techniques.

Seth says that the upper back is a very complex muscle group, so the only way to train for complete development is to train it on its own separate training day.

Like most bodybuilders, Seth Feroce trains using a 5-day training split. Check it out:

The Seth Feroce Training Split

  • Day 1: Chest
  • Day 2: Back
  • Day 3: Off
  • Day 4: Shoulders
  • Day 5: Legs
  • Day 6: Arms
  • Day 7: Off

Seth Feroce likes this training split because it allows him to focus on just one muscle group per workout. This is the only way he can perform his high-volume workouts, where he hits each muscle group with 4-6 different exercises at a time.

When it comes to training the upper back, Seth Feroce likes to focus on pull ups, pulldowns and different types of rows. He says these are the exercises that he feels the best, especially in his lats.

Here is a perfect example of how Seth Feroce likes to design his upper back workouts. Check it out:

Seth Feroce Upper Back Workout #1

  • Exercise #1: T-bar row, 4 sets of 12, 10, 10, 8 reps
  • Exercise #2: Chest supported row, 4 sets of 12, 10, 10, 8 reps
  • Exercise #3: One-arm DB rows, 3 sets to failure
  • Exercise #4: Lat pulldowns (wide / overhand grip), 3 sets of 12 reps
  • Exercise #5: Seated cable rows (supinated grip), 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Exercise #6: 45 degree back extensions, 4 sets of 12 reps

Here is the training video:

Talk about a high-volume workout! Seth Feroce trains his upper back using 5 different exercises. He also performs about 100 reps of pull ups at the start of the workout to get everything warmed up.

He doesn’t even count the pull ups – he performs them every workout no matter what.

If you watch the video, you will notice that Seth Feroce is pushing himself as hard as he can on every single exercise. He says too many people are worried about overtraining, when they should be worried about giving 110% in the gym.

“You gotta push yourself in your workouts. You can’t be a giant vagina! You can’t be like, “oh, I don’t want to do too much…” NO! I want to push myself to go as far as I can.

Hence where supplementation comes in. I want to be fueled and ready with the water and food that I eat. But then having the hydraulic and other stuff.”

During the workout Seth gives some great advice, such as the importance of feeling your lower lats working on your different upper back workouts.

Seth says the upper lats are easy to engage, but most people totally neglect their lower lats, and it shows in their physique.

“Activating your lower lats. If you can’t feel your lower lats working when you are doing a lower lat exercise then you aren’t working your lower lats.

Whenever you do an exercise you have to feel the target muscle working. If you can’t feel it, then it ain’t working!”

Here is another one of Seth Feroce’s go-to upper back workouts. Check it out:

Workout #2

  • Exercise #1: T-bar row, 4 sets of 8-15 reps
  • Exercise #2: Lat pulldown (wide / overhand grip), 4 sets of 8-15 reps
  • Exercise #3: Chest supported row (wide / overhand grip), 4 sets of 8-15 reps
  • Exercise #4: One-arm hammer strength pulldown (supinated grip), 4 sets of 8-15 reps
  • Exercise #5: One-arm machine row (neutral grip), 4 sets of 8-15 reps
  • Exercise #6: Lat pulldown (wide / overhand grip), 4 sets of 8-15 reps

Here is the training video:

This workout is very similar to the previous one. As usual Seth performs up to 100 reps of pull ups to warm up his body. He says this is just a warm up for him – he doesn’t even count them as part of his overall back training volume.

“I want to get 75-100 pull downs, pull ups, anything like that – that’s my warm up. Every time I’m sweating like crazy already.”

After the pull ups Seth moves onto T-bar rows and a variety of other exercises for his upper back. Seth says he is lucky to have a spotter during this workout, as it lets him push himself even harder on certain back exercises.

“This is the benefit of having a spotter when you’re bodybuilding.

Whenever you’re spotting someone, I keep my hand on the bar, I keep my hand here so I can feel his rhythm so I know exactly what he’s doing.

And as we move up the weight, I can feel where someone struggles and that’s where I help them.”

Every once in a while Seth Feroce will include deadlifts or rack deadlifts in his bodybuilding back workouts.

He says that this exercise is not very important for advanced bodybuilders, as you can build a massive upper back with easier exercises like pull downs and rows.

However, he sometimes includes this exercise to really smoke his upper traps and spinal erectors. Check it out:

Workout #3

  • Exercise #1: T-bar row, 4 sets of 8-15 reps
  • Exercise #2: Lat pulldown (wide / neutral grip), 4 sets of 8-15 reps
  • Exercise #3: One-arm DB row, 4 sets of 8-15 reps
  • Exercise #4: Seated cable row (wide / overhand grip), 4 sets of 8-15 reps
  • Exercise #5: Rack deadlift, 4 sets of 8-15 reps

Here is the training video:

As usual, Seth starts the workout with pull ups and t-bar rows. Here is Seth talking about his pull up warmup:

“I start every single workout with pull ups. My fat ass can’t do pull ups obviously so I’m doing assisted pull ups. I can’t do 100 reps with regular pull ups so I start with assisted.

Pull ups and pull downs are not the same thing. Don’t tell me you do pulldowns to warm up. Pull ups are better than pulldowns. The goal is to push blood into the muscle.”

Seth Feroce puts his rack deadlifts towards the end of his workout, rather than at the start.

He says this is a smart choice for advanced bodybuilders, because it limits the amount of weight that you can lift and it places more stress on your upper back muscles.

“I want to make sure with rack pulls that I’m not just moving the weight. I can sit there and bang the weight off the bars and feel good when I get 6 plates. I don’t want to do that.

I want to focus on feeling from my lower lats up into my lats, into may teres major, minor, traps, rear delts – I want to feel it from the top of my ass cheeks to the top of my neck.”

Placing deadlifts at the end of your back workouts is a strategy that John Meadows, Dorian Yates and many other bodybuilders have used.

It is a great strategy if you are an advanced bodybuilder, and you don’t want to risk injury deadlifting more than 5 plates per side.

Conclusion

Seth Feroce trains his upper back one day per week on its own separate training day. He likes to use about 4-6 exercises per workout to really target all of the different muscles of the upper back.

Seth normally starts his workout with 100 reps on pull ups and a few heavy sets of t-bar rows. After that it all depends on how he is feeling that day.

If you are an advanced bodybuilder and you respond well to high-volume workouts, then Seth Feroce’s back workout may be just what you need to take your upper back to the next level.

“When you’re by yourself at night, putting your head on your pillow, when it’s you by yourself, You have to have that superhero moment! You have to have those visions – that’s how fantasy turns to reality!

You don’t have to be intense like me, but you’ve gotta have that feeling about something in life! That’s how all this started for me – I dreamt about it. I daydreamed!”

Thank you for reading and I wish you the best of luck on your strength training journey!

 

Dr. Mike Jansen, PT, DPT

What's going on! My name is Dr. Mike Jansen, I'm the creator of Revolutionary Program Design. If you want to take your training to the next level, then you've come to the right place... My goal is to make RPD the #1 strength training resource available anywhere in the world!

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