The Josh Bryant Squat Program!


The squat is one of the most difficult exercises to train. This is especially true if you are a powerlifter. If you are willing to work your ass off to build a huge squat then I have just the solution for you: the Josh Bryant squat program!

Introduction

  • Part 1: Overview
  • Part 2: The Top Set
  • Part 3: Compensatory Acceleration Training
  • Part 4: Supplementary Exercises
  • Part 5: Accessory Exercises
  • Part 6: Optimal Training Frequency
  • Part 7: Deload To Reload
  • Part 8: Sample Training Program

In this comprehensive guide I am going to teach you everything you need to know to design your very own powerlifting training cycle for the squat. I will be covering everything from how to structure your training cycle, how to design your individual workouts, how to peak your strength for your competition day, and everything in between.

I will even be covering the exact training cycle that Chad Wesley Smith used to hit his first 900+ pound squat in competition.

Josh Bryant knows a thing or two about building a huge squat. He has personally coached some of the strongest squatters in the world including Chad Wesley Smith of Juggernaut Training Systems.

Here is Chad squatting an earth-shattering 905 pounds in competition under Josh’s guidance:

Talk about impressive! 

The Josh Bryant squat program combines the best aspects of old-school linear periodization with many new-school training techniques such as compensatory acceleration training and targeted weak point training.

Josh is truly a master of not only building strength in the squat but helping you to display it where it truly counts: on the powerlifting platform.

Note: if you have any trouble reading the workouts in this article then please consult this article.

Now let’s get down to business…

Part 1: Overview

The Josh Bryant squat program is designed for one thing and one thing only: to set you up for a huge squat on the day of your powerlifting competition. In order to do this Josh structures his powerlifters’ squat workouts in a very specific way.

Check it out:

  • Exercise #1: Competition-style squat for a top set of 1-3 reps
  • Exercise #2: Speed squat for multiple sets of 2-4 reps
  • Exercise #3: Supplementary squat exercise
  • Exercises #4-6: Accessory squat exercises

Josh Bryant is a huge believer in the principle of specificity. He believes that if you want to put up a huge squat on the powerlifting platform then you have to start your squat workouts with the competition squat itself. After all, if you don’t train the competition lift how are you going to get better at it?

Josh has all of his powerlifting clients start their squat workouts by working up to a heavy set of 1-3 reps. This top set is not performed as a 1-3 rep max. Instead it is performed with a slightly submaximal weight.

These top sets are based off of percentages that will be covered in part 2 of this article.

After the top set Josh has his clients perform several sets of speed squats, 1-2 supplementary exercises and 2-4 accessory exercises. The supplementary exercises are similar to the competition squat itself and are designed to directly drive up your squatting strength.

For example the “dead squat,” Olympic-style back squats and rack lockouts are some of Josh’s favorite supplementary squat exercises.

The accessory exercises are also important and are designed to build muscle mass and address muscular imbalances in the lower body. These exercises tend to be more bodybuilding-style isolation exercises and are often performed for higher reps.

Some of Josh’s favorite squat accessory exercises include split squats, lunges, glute ham raises, and unilateral stiff-legged deadlifts. All of these different types of exercises and training methods work synergistically to improve your squatting strength over the course of your 8-16 week training cycle.

Let’s take a look at a typical squat workout from Chad Wesley Smith’s legendary 905 pound squat training cycle. Check it out:

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 5 x 3, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 8 x 1, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Single leg squats on box, 3 x 12, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift, 3 x 5, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • F1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

As you can see this workout perfectly matches the template covered above. Chad kicks off his squat workout by working up to a heavy triple on the competition back squat itself. This triple is relatively heavy but not a true 3-rep max.

After performing his heaviest set for the day Chad takes some weight off the bar and busts out multiple sets of speed reps. After the speed reps Chad performs his key supplementary exercise, the “dead squat.” Don’t worry, this exercise will be covered in more depth below.

Finally Chad wraps up his workout with 3 accessory exercises targeting his quads, hamstrings and abs. Don’t worry, we will be covering this exact workout in MUCH more depth in the rest of this article.

The important thing is that you are at least somewhat familiar with the basic squat workout template that Josh often uses with his athletes.

Josh normally organizes his squat programs as 12-week peaking cycles. One of his go-to strategies is to have his athletes train heavy for three weeks in a row followed by a single deload week. He often has his athletes train with triples for 3 weeks, doubles for 3 weeks, and finally singles for 3 weeks.

For example:

  • Weeks 1-3: Triples
  • Week 4: Deload
  • Weeks 5-7: Triples
  • Week 8: Deload
  • Weeks 9-11: Singles
  • Week 12: Deload

Of course week 13 would be the week of your powerlifting competition! 

As you can see Josh structures the training cycle so that you are lifting heavier and heavier as you progress through the training cycle.

You don’t want to be one of those people who hits their biggest weights halfway through their training cycle. The only thing that matters is how strong you are on competition day and Josh’s peaking programs definitely reflect that.

Part 2: The Top Set

The principle of specificity states that if you want to get stronger on an exercise then you have to actually train that exercise. Josh knows that the best way to build strength in the competition back squat is to actually train it!

With this in mind Josh starts every one of his powerlifting clients’ squat workouts with the competition back squat itself. Each workout you are going to perform a triple, double or single on your competition-style squat. 

Let’s take another look at Chad Wesley Smith’s sample squat workout:

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 5 x 3, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 8 x 1, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Single leg squats on box, 3 x 12, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift, 3 x 5, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • F1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

The “A1” exercise that is highlighted above represents the top set for this workout. Chad works up to a reasonably heavy triple on the squat before moving onto his speed sets, supplementary exercises and accessory exercises.

Of course the top set for each workout is based off of percentages. These percentages must be customized for each individual for optimal results. Of course it is possible to give some general guidelines.

Here is what your 3-week block of triples might look like:

  • Week 1: 85% x 3 reps
  • Week 2: 87% x 3 reps
  • Week 3: 89% x 3 reps

Of course week 4 would be your deload week. I will cover how to deload in more depth in part 7 of this article. However, as a general rule of thumb a good strategy is to work up to 65% of your max for 3 reps.

As you can see your training percentages creep up over the course of the first 3 weeks of the training cycle. By the third week you should be lifting a weight that is close to your previous best 3-rep max in the squat.

Here is what your 3-week block of doubles might look like:

  • Week 5: 91% x 2 reps
  • Week 6: 93% x 2 reps
  • Week 7: 95% x 2 reps

Again week 8 would be your designated deload week. This is a very demanding block of training. Don’t worry, your strength should have increased significantly over the course of the training cycle. By week 7 you should be performing a double with a weight that exceeds your previous best 2-rep max.

Finally here is what your 3-week block of singles might look like:

  • Week 9: 97% x 1 reps
  • Week 10: 99% x 1 reps
  • Week 11: 101% x 1 reps

Of course week 12 would be your final deload week before your competition. As you can see by week 11 you are performing a single with a weight that is slightly above your previous best 1-rep max. This is quite normal if you set up your training cycle correctly.

On your competition week you can expect to hit a single around 105-110% of your previous best 1-rep max. 

Of course all of these percentages are just estimates. In reality these percentages should be adjusted on a week-by-week basis to make sure that you are progressing optimally.

Some individuals will be able to make relatively large weight jumps from one week to the next while others will only be able to make smaller jumps. An experienced coach is often necessary to make these week-by-week adjustments to the overall training plan.

Part 3: Compensatory Acceleration Training

Compensatory acceleration training is one of the most effective training methods you can use for building maximal strength.

The idea is simple: you are going to lift a submaximal weight as explosively as possible. The faster you can accelerate the bar the more you will tap into your high-threshold motor units and the more strength you will build. 

Here is Chad giving a perfect demonstration of speed squats:

Compensatory acceleration training is almost identical to the dynamic effort method as utilized by the Westside Barbell training club. Of course Josh has a unique way of programming these speed sets into his powerlifters’ workouts.

Instead of having a separate speed day he has his powerlifters perform the speed sets after the main top set of the day. Let’s take another look at our sample squat workout from Chad Wesley Smith:

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 5 x 3, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 8 x 1, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Single leg squats on box, 3 x 12, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift, 3 x 5, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • F1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

Chad performs his speed squats immediately after his top set for the day. These speed sets have many benefits:

  • They increase the rate of force development
  • They help build maximal strength
  • They reinforce proper technique on the competition lift

As you can see these speed sets are a very versatile training tool. Josh has his powerlifters perform 2-4 reps per set depending on where they are in the training cycle. For example:

  • Triples weeks: 6-10 x 4 @ 70%
  • Doubles weeks: 4-8 x 3 @ 80%
  • Singles weeks: 2-6 x 2 @ 90%

Once again these percentages are based off of your previous 1-rep max in the squat. As you can see the percentages for the speed sets gradually increase over the course of the training cycle. This is consistent with Josh’s general philosophy of using progressively heavier weights to help you peak for your powerlifting competition. 

Part 4: Supplementary Exercises

Supplementary exercises play an important role in Josh Bryant’s squat workouts. Supplementary exercises are all variations of the main competition lift. They are normally performed for low to moderate reps and are designed to directly drive up your strength in the competition lifts.

Let’s take another look at Chad Wesley Smith’s squat workout:

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 3, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 5 x 3, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 8 x 1, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Single leg squats on box, 3 x 12, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift, 3 x 5, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • F1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

In this workout Chad performs one supplementary lift: the dead squat. The supplementary lift is performed after the speed squats but before the lighter accessory work. As a general rule of thumb supplementary squat exercises can be divided into two categories: 

  • Exercises that improve your strength out of the hole
  • Exercises that improve your lockout strength

Josh Bryant frequently uses exercises such as the dead squat and paused Olympic-style squats to improve a powerlifter’s squatting strength out of the bottom position. The dead squat is a particularly effective exercise for this purpose.

Here is one of Josh Bryant’s clients demonstrating the dead squat:

Most trainees have a sticking point in the squat 1-2 inches above parallel. This is the exact moment where the stretch reflex wears off and you are squatting the weight up with nothing but your muscles. The dead squat is so effective because it increases your starting strength right at this sticking point.

Of course this exercise should only be performed for multiple sets of single repetitions. Performing multiple reps in a row would defeat the purpose of the exercise as you would start to use your stretch reflex to help you lift the load.

Josh typically has his clients perform this exercise with a safety squat bar as it can be difficult getting into the correct starting position with a straight bar. Another great exercise for improving your starting strength is a paused Olympic style squat. You can click right here for a perfect demonstration of the paused Olympic squat by James Strickland.

This exercise has less direct carryover to the competition back squat but it can be a great choice for many trainees. 

It is a little more rare for a trainee to struggle with locking out a squat in competition. After all, you are in a much stronger mechanical position as you approach lockout compared to when you are in the hole.

Still you may stand to benefit from some targeted lockout work. One of the best exercises for this purpose is the rack lockout.

For this exercise you are going to lockout a weight and hold it for 5-10 seconds. This can be a great way to force your nervous system to acclimate to having heavier weights on your back. This exercise is very effective but it is easy to burnout your central nervous system if you are not careful.

Josh typically has his trainees perform this exercise for no more than 1-3 workouts in a row before moving on. Another reasonable choice would be to perform back squats with chains. You can click right here to see Chad Wesley Smith perform a set of back squats with chains.

Chad Wesley Smith sometimes uses this variation to overload the lockout portion of the lift and to teach his body to maximally accelerate the load. It is important that you do not over-do the chain work. After all, you do not squat with chains in your competition!

Many trainees have learned the hard way that getting carried away with accommodating resistance can screw up your technique with straight weight. Still, Josh has used the chain squat as a core supplementary lift with many of his athletes. It is a viable exercise as long as you are careful with your long-term programming.

Part 5: Accessory Exercises

Josh Bryant instructs all of his powerlifting clients to perform various accessory exercises at the end of their squat workouts.These accessory exercises play a critical role in your long-term progress. They help you increase your work capacity, build or maintain muscular hypertrophy and strengthen weak muscle groups.

Your accessory exercises may not be as critical as your competition lift or your 1-2 supplemental movements but they are still very important.

Here are some squat accessory exercises that Josh Bryant has used with his powerlifting clients over the years:

Quadriceps

  • DB split squat
  • DB lunges
  • Leg press
  • Unilateral leg press
  • Backwards sled drags

Hamstrings

  • Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift
  • Unilateral barbell Romanian deadlift
  • Glute-ham raise
  • Leg curls
  • Forwards sled drags

Abs

  • Hanging leg raise
  • Roman chair sit ups
  • Decline sit ups

You may want to perform 2-4 accessory exercises for 5-15 reps as part of your squat workout. These exercises should NOT be performed all-out or all the way to muscular failure. Instead it is a good idea to leave at least a rep or two in the tank on your sets.

Josh often has his athletes perform the accessory sets with an RPE of 6-8/10. If you are familiar with the RPE system then this would be an excellent starting point.

Part 6: Optimal Training Frequency

Optimal training frequency for the squat is easily one of the most controversial topics in the fitness industry today. On one hand you have guys who believe that you should squat several times per week for optimal results. In fact John Broz has his athletes squatting heavy 7 days per week!

On the other hand you have guys like Stan Efferding and Eric Lilliebridge who have set powerlifting world records squatting once every 2 weeks. Josh Bryant understands that no two trainees are alike and that you must individualize the training prescription for optimal results.

Here are five possible squatting frequencies that you may want to try:

  • Once a week
  • Once every 9-10 days
  • Once every 2 weeks

Let’s take a closer look at each of these options.

Squat Frequency: Once A Week

With this option you are going to have two lower body workouts per week. One of these workouts will focus on the squat while the other will focus on the deadlift.

For example:

  • Sunday: Bench press
  • Monday: Squat
  • Wednesday: Bench press accessory
  • Friday: Deadlift

This is a fantastic way to train. Body parts are trained twice per week on this upper / lower split which tends to work well for a large number of powerlifters. 

It’s interesting to note that Josh sometimes has his athletes perform a few light sets of squats on their deadlift days. 

For example:

  • Sunday: Bench press
  • Monday: Squat
  • Wednesday: Bench press accessory
  • Friday: Light squat / heavy deadlift

These lighter squat sets are performed as part of the warm up. For example Josh sometimes has his athletes perform 2 sets of 5 reps at 50% of their 1-rep max with the safety squat bar.

Josh does this to help his athletes warm up for their deadlift sets and to increase their squat training frequency to twice per week. This is an excellent option if you are someone who “forgets” how to squat if you have too much time in between squat workouts.

Squat Frequency: Once Every 10 Days

This is a slightly unconventional training frequency that Josh has used with his athletes in the past. For example the strongest bench presser in the world Julius Maddox often trains with a once-every-five-days training frequency. For example:

  • Day 1: Bench press
  • Day 3: Squat
  • Day 6: Bench press accessory
  • Day 8: Deadlift
  • Day 11: Repeat

The squat is trained once every 10 days. Many athletes find that their lower backs cannot recover from two heavy lower body workouts in a 7-day time period. If this describes you then this would be an excellent approach to try.

Actually our squatting hero Chad Wesley Smith used a very similar training frequency when he put up his first 900+ pound squat in competition. He used what he called a “9 day work week.” Check it out:

  • Day 1: Deadlift
  • Day 2: Off
  • Day 3: Bench press
  • Day 4: Off
  • Day 5: Squat
  • Day 6: Upper back
  • Day 7: Off
  • Day 8: Bench press accessory
  • Day 9: Off

Chad admits that he used this approach largely because his lower back could not recover from two heavy lower body workouts in a single 7-day week.

Once every 2 weeks

A rather extreme approach is to only train the squat heavy once every 2 weeks. For example:

  • Week 1: Heavy squat workout
  • Week 2: Heavy deadlift workout

This is not an approach that Josh uses very often but for some individuals it truly does work like magic. If you are interested in learning more about this ultra-low-frequency approach then you must check out the following article:

The Lilliebridge Method: The Ultimate Guide!

Part 7: Deload To Reload

Josh Bryant believes that you can’t train heavy all the time. Of course you can try to lift heavy every single week but you probably won’t get very far training that way. Josh has almost all of his powerlifting clients perform a formal deload week once every 3-6 weeks.

A deload simply refers to a period of time where the overall training stress is reduced. These deloads give your body a chance to fully recover from the prior 2-5 weeks of heavy training. Many powerlifters find that their strength practically shoots through the roof after a deload workout!

As a general rule of thumb Josh likes his athletes to train with 70% of their normal training weights and volume during a deload workout.

For example here is a typical Josh Bryant style deload squat workout might look like:

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 3 x 3**, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Single leg squats on box, 2 x 12**, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift, 2 x 5**, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Hanging leg raises, 2 x 15**, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 70% of your training weights from the previous week.

As you can see both the overall training volume and the training loads are significantly reduced. This reduction in both training volume AND load is essential for letting your central nervous system recover from the previous few weeks of training.

Remember, Josh Bryant has his clients perform a huge amount of volume every workout. If you do not take it easy once in a while then you will be pummeled into the ground! 

In terms of the structure of the deload squat workouts Josh likes his clients to perform the main competition lift and some accessory exercises only. The compensatory acceleration training sets and the supplemental exercises are normally dropped during deload weeks. 

If you are going to model your squat training after Josh Bryant then I strongly recommend you perform a deload week once every 3-6 weeks. Josh normally has his first-time training clients deload once every 4 weeks and adjust upwards or downwards as necessary.

Part 8: Sample Training Program

If you’ve made it this far you should have a good understanding of how Josh Bryant structures his powerlifting clients’ squat workouts when peaking for competition.

Of course this article would not be complete without a sample peaking cycle for the squat. Josh Bryant has trained many world-class squatters over the years. However, very few people have impressed me as much as Chad Wesley Smith.

I still remember reading his EliteFTS training log way back in 2011 when he put up his first 900+ pound raw squat. I couldn’t believe it! How could anyone be so freaking strong? 

Fortunately for us Chad posted his entire training cycle including the weights he used in every workout leading up to his competition. I strongly recommend you study these workouts closely if you are at all interested in Josh Bryant’s unique style of programming. 

Please keep in mind that Chad used his “9 day work week” for this training cycle. For example:

  • Day 1: Deadlift
  • Day 2: Off
  • Day 3: Bench press
  • Day 4: Off
  • Day 5: Squat
  • Day 6: Upper back
  • Day 7: Off
  • Day 8: Bench press accessory
  • Day 9: Off

Now let’s take a look at the workouts.

Check it out:

Week 1 (Triples)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 3**, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 5 x 3***, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 8 x 1****, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Single leg squats on box, 3 x 12, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift, 3 x 5, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • F1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 75% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

***Performed with 59% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

****Performed with 53% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

Week 2 (Triples)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 3**, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 5 x 3***, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 8 x 1****, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift, 3 x 3, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 76% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

***Performed with 59% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

****Performed with 56% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

Week 3 (Triples)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 3**, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 5 x 3***, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 8 x 1****, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift, 3 x 5, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 79% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

***Performed with 59% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

****Performed with 58% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

You can click right here to see a video of Chad Wesley Smith’s top set from week 3 of this training cycle.

Week 4 (Deload)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 3**, 1/0/X/0, rest as needed

**Performed with 63% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

Week 5 (Doubles)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 2**, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 5 x 3***, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 3 x 1****, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift, 3 x 3, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Hanging leg raises, 3 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 82% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

***Performed with 65% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

****Performed with 63% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

Week 6 (Doubles)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 2**, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat rack lockout, 1 x 1***, X/0/X/10, 180 seconds rest
  • C1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 5 x 3****, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 3 x 1*****, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • E1: Unilateral DB Romanian deadlift, 3 x 3, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest
  • F1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 84% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

***Performed with 92% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

****Performed with 66% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

*****Performed with 65% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

You can click right here to see Chad’s top set of squats from week 6 of this training cycle.

Week 7 (Doubles)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 2**, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 3 x 3***, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 1 x 1****, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 87% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

***Performed with 68% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

****Performed with 66% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

Week 8 (Doubles)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 1**, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 3 x 2***, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Dead squat w/ safety squat bar (from parallel), 1 x 1****, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • D1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 89% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

***Performed with 73% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

****Performed with 68% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

Week 9 (Singles)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 1**, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Back squat speed sets (competition stance), 2 x 2***, 1/0/X/1, 60 seconds rest
  • C1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 91% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

***Performed with 75% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

Week 10 (Singles)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 1**, 1/0/X/0, 180 seconds rest
  • B1: Hanging leg raises, 5 x 15, 1/0/1/0, 60 seconds rest

**Performed with 93% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

Week 11 (Singles)

  • A1: Back squat (competition stance), 1 x 1**, 1/0/X/0, rest as needed

**Performed with 63% of your anticipated 1-rep max in competition.

Week 12 (Competition week!)

Chad was successful with 905 pounds in his meet but barely missed 935. You can click right here to see Chad squat 905 pounds in competition.

Conclusion

Josh Bryant is widely regarded as one of the world’s most successful strength coaches. He has trained world class athletes in numerous different sports including bodybuilding, powerlifting, and strongman.

If you are stuck at a training plateau in the squat then I strongly recommend you give the Josh Bryant squat program a try.

“Only the weak blame parents, their race, their times, lack of good fortune or the quirks of fate. Everyone has the power to say, ‘This I am today. That I shall be tomorrow.” 

Thank you for reading and I wish you the best of luck in your strength training journey!

Dr. Mike Jansen, PT, DPT

Thanks for checking out my site! My name is Dr. Mike Jansen and I'm the founder of Revolutionary Program Design. If you want to reach your size and strength goals faster then you've come to the right place. My goal is to make RPD the #1 strength training resource available anywhere in the world. So grab a seat, kick back and relax. There's never been a better time to lift weights or to learn the art and science of strength training program design.

Recent Posts