The Jeff Nippard Training Program!


Jeff Nippard is one of the most popular fitness experts in the world today. Jeff is a professional drug-free bodybuilder and powerlifter who is better known for his YouTube channel where he teaches science-based training methods for building muscle mass and strength.

One of Jeff’s favorite ways to train is with full body workouts. If you are looking for a great full body training program to build size and strength then this article is for you!

Introduction

  • Part 1: Jeff Nippard’s Full Body Training Split
  • Part 2: Jeff Nippard’s Full Body Workouts

In this helpful guide I will show you how Jeff Nippard uses full body workouts to blast through training plateaus and build size and strength all over his body.

Jeff has used many training programs in his quest to become a better bodybuilder and powerlifter. However, he is a huge fan of higher-frequency training programs. Jeff believes that the scientific literature supports higher-frequency programs as a superior way to train for size and strength.

One of Jeff’s favorite high-frequency training programs is his 5 days per week full body split. Yes, you read that right – Jeff Nippard gets his best results training each body part 5 days per week! This is radically different from other professional bodybuilders and powerlifters who tend to train each muscle group once every 3-7 days.

Why does Jeff train this way? Jeff believes that hitting each muscle group several times per week is the best way for an advanced trainee to keep protein synthesis elevated. Here is Jeff discussing this exact concept:

“So basically after you lift weights there’s a period of time when muscle protein synthesis increases and the muscle becomes more sensitive to amino acids. This is why your muscles grow in the first place.”

“Research tells us that that response stays elevated for about 2 days or so in new lifters but returns in just 12 hours or so in more experienced trainees. So the original theory was that if you are a well trained lifter the more frequently you can hit a muscle the more spikes you see in protein synthesis and the more muscle growth you get as a result.”

This is an interesting theory by Jeff Nippard. But is there any research to back it up? Jeff Nippard believes that a secret Norwegian powerlifting study has the answers.

According to this study powerlifters who trained with full body workouts 6 days per week made twice as much progress as powerlifters who trained with full body workouts 3 days per week. You can click right here to read an article by “Stronger By Science” on this exact study.

It may sound silly to base your whole training program on a secret Norwegian study that no one has heard of. However, Jeff Nippard has gotten excellent results with his 5 days per week full body program. As they say, “you can’t argue with results!”

Here is the exact full body split that Jeff uses:

Jeff Nippard’s Training Split

  • Monday: Full Body (Squat Focus)
  • Tuesday: Full Body (Deadlift Focus)
  • Wednesday: Off
  • Thursday: Full Body (Squat Focus)
  • Friday: Full Body (Deadlift Focus)
  • Saturday: Full Body (Free Day)
  • Sunday: Off

Jeff focuses on the squat or deadlift in 4 of his workouts. Of course he performs plenty of upper body exercises on these workouts such as bench presses, overhead presses, pull ups and rows.

Jeff uses his 5th weekly workout as a “free day” where he performs extra work for whatever muscle group she feels need more attention. Jeff uses this free day as an arm / pump day but he says you can train whatever muscle groups you want on this day. Jeff says the free day is great from a psychological perspective – think of it like a “cheat meal” for your muscles!

Now let’s look at some of Jeff’s weekly workouts to get a better idea of how he actually trains. Note: Jeff doesn’t always include his rest periods or target exercise tempos so I have left them out of the workouts. Check it out:

Jeff Nippard’s Full Body Workout #1

  • A1: Back squat, 2 sets of 6-8 reps**
  • B1: Barbell overhead press, 2 sets of 8 reps
  • C1: Nordic hamstring curls, 2 sets of 8 reps
  • D1: Helms row, 3 sets of 12-15 reps
  • E1: Dumbbell hammer curl, 3 sets of 20-25 reps

**Performed at 72.5 – 77.5% of your 1-rep max.

Here are the individual exercise videos: exercise A1, exercise B1, exercise C1, exercise D1, exercise E1.

Here is the full training video for Jeff’s 1st weekly workout:

Jeff’s first weekly workout is focused on the back squat. Jeff performs a heavy top set and a back-off set. Both of these sets were based on training percentages using his estimated 1-rep max. Jeff really likes the back off set because it lets you really focus on correcting any technical flaws that you identify from your heavy top set.

The rest of the workout uses a variety of exercises for his upper and lower body including overhead presses, Nordic hamstring curls, helms rows and dumbbell hammer curls. It’s very important that you don’t use too much training volume on any one training day. Remember, Jeff is training each muscle group up to 5 times per week with this split!

Here is Jeff’s second weekly workout. Check it out:

Jeff Nippard’s Full Body Workout #2

  • A1: Sumo deadlift, 4 sets of 2 reps**
  • B1: Bench press, 3 sets of 6-8 reps
  • C1: Hip abduction, 2 sets of 15-20 reps
  • D1: Weighted pull up, 3 sets of 5-8 reps
  • E1: Standing calf raise, 2 sets of 10-12 reps

**Performed at 85% of your 1-rep max.

Here are the individual exercise videos: exercise A1, exercise B1, exercise C1, exercise D1, exercise E1.

Here is the full training video for Jeff’s 2nd weekly workout:

Jeff’s second full body workout focuses on the deadlift and the bench press.

When Jeff first tried the 5 days per week full body split he was afraid that his strength would go down training big exercises like the squat and deadlift on back-to-back training days. He was pleasantly surprised when his strength actually improved!

Once again Jeff is careful not to perform more than 2-3 working sets per exercise. Even on the working sets Jeff keeps 2-3 reps in the tank on each set so that he doesn’t build up too much neural fatigue by training to failure.

Jeff takes a day off on Wednesday before starting his 3rd weekly full body workout on Thursday. Check it out:

Jeff Nippard’s Full Body Workout #3

  • A1: Back squat, 4 sets of 4 reps** @ 85% of your 1-rep max
  • B1: DB floor press, 3 sets of 12 reps
  • C1: Hanging leg raise, 3 sets of 12 reps
  • D1: Lat pullover, 3 sets of 12 reps
  • E1: Incline dumbbell curl, 2 sets of 12-15 reps
  • F1: Band face pull, 4 sets of 15-20 reps

**Performed at 85% of your 1-rep max.

Here are the individual exercise videos: exercise A1, exercise B1, exercise C1, exercise D1, exercise E1, exercise E2.

Here is the full training video for Jeff’s 3rd weekly workout:

Jeff’s third weekly full body workout focuses on the back squat and various other upper body exercises.

One of the interesting things about Jeff’s full body training program is that he uses different accessory exercises for each muscle group on each training day. This can be an effective training strategy to avoid plateaus or even boredom in the gym.

He is still training each exercise about once every 7 days so his body probably won’t “forget” how to perform that exercise. However, he gets the benefits of different exercises throughout the week to stimulate each muscle in a slightly different way.

Now let’s take a look at Jeff’s 4th weekly full body workout. Check it out:

Jeff Nippard’s Full Body Workout #4

  • A1: Deadlift 2-3 sets of 2 reps
  • B1: Paused bench press, 2 sets of 5 reps
  • C1: Humble row, 3 sets of 10 reps
  • D1: Nordic ham curl, 2 sets of 6-8 reps
  • E1: Incline shrug, 3 sets of 15-20 reps

**Performed at 70-80% of your 1-rep max. Pause for 2-3 seconds with the weight 2 inches off the floor on the concentric range of each rep. See the video below for more details.

Here are the individual exercise videos: exercise A1, exercise B1, exercise C1, exercise D1, exercise E1.

Here is the full training video for Jeff’s 4th weekly workout:

Jeff’s 4th weekly full body workout focuses on the deadlift and the bench press.

Jeff does something really interesting on his deadlift sets: he takes a 2-3 second isometric pause with the weight a few inches off the ground during the concentric range of the exercise. In other words he deadlifts the weight about 3 inches off the ground, pauses there for 2-3 seconds and then finishes the exercise.

Jeff likes this technique because it forces you to maintain an arched lower back and proper form throughout the entire range of motion instead of just at the start of the pull.

Once again Jeff uses some unconventional accessory exercises such as the humble row and the Nordic ham curl.

Finally let’s take a look at Jeff’s 5th full body workout, aka his “free day.” Check it out:

Jeff Nippard’s Full Body Workout #5

  • A1: Standing barbell curl, 3 sets of 12 reps
  • A2: Floor skull crusher, 3 sets of 12 reps
  • B1: Incline DB curl, 3 sets of 21 reps** 
  • B2: Tricep pushdown, 3 sets of 21 reps**
  • C1: DB lateral raise, 3 sets of 10-12 reps
  • C2: Band pull apart, 3 sets of 10-12 reps
  • C3: Standing calf raise, 3 sets of 10-12 reps
  • C4: Bicycle crunch, 3 sets of 10-12 reps
  • D1: Neck flexion, 3 sets of 15-20 reps
  • D2: Neck extension, 3 sets of 15-20 reps

**Performed as Jeff Nippard style reverse-21’s. Perform 7 full range of motion reps, then 7 partial reps in the top half of the range of motion, then 7 partial reps in the bottom half of the range of motion.

Here are the individual exercise videos: exercise A1, exercise A2, exercise B1, exercise B2, exercise C1, exercise C2, exercise C3, exercise C4, exercise D1, exercise D2.

Here is the training video:

Jeff uses his 5th weekly workout to focus on some smaller muscle groups like his arms, shoulders, calves and neck. Even on this training day Jeff uses some interesting training techniques like giant sets, partial range of motion reps and direct neck training.

I especially like the supersets performed for the arms at the beginning of the workout. Research shows that antagonistic supersets where you alternate back and forth between sets for 2 opposing muscle groups are extremely effective for building size and strength.

They help you produce more force in the target muscle groups, they improve your muscular endurance and they allow you to perform more work in less time. Talk about a potent training method!

So what’s the verdict? Is Jeff Nippard’s 5 days per week full body workout the best way to train for size and strength?

Jeff’s program is rather extreme and I don’t recommend it for most of my readers here at Revolutionary Program Design. Most advanced bodybuilders and powerlifters will have a very hard time getting stronger if they are squatting and deadlift on back-to-back workouts.

However, if you thrive on higher-frequency workouts and have above-average recovery ability then Jeff’s program is definitely worth trying out. It works awesome for Jeff Nippard and it may be just what you need to take your training to the next level!

“What we face may look insurmountable. But I learned something from all those years of training and competing. I learned something from all those sets and reps when I didn’t think I could lift another ounce of weight. What I learned is that we are always stronger than we know.”

Thank you for reading and I wish you the best of luck on your strength training journey!

Dr. Mike Jansen, PT, DPT

Thanks for checking out my site! My name is Dr. Mike Jansen and I'm the founder of Revolutionary Program Design. If you want to reach your size and strength goals faster then you've come to the right place. My goal is to make RPD the #1 strength training resource available anywhere in the world. So grab a seat, kick back and relax. There's never been a better time to lift weights or to learn the art and science of strength training program design.

Recent Posts