What’s The Best Deadlift Training Frequency?


What’s the best deadlift training frequency? That is a great question!

The truth is you can make great progress training the deadlift anywhere from twice per week to once every two weeks.

If you want to learn how often to train the deadlift then this article is for you!

Introduction

  • Part 1: Deadlift Twice Per Week
  • Part 2: Deadlift Once Per Week
  • Part 3: Deadlift Once Every Two Weeks

In this comprehensive guide I will teach you how often you should train the deadlift for maximum results.

The world’s strongest athletes train the deadlift twice per week, once per week or once every two weeks.

All of these deadlift strategies work for some people. The most important thing is to figure out the deadlift training frequency that works for you! 

The first option is to train the deadlift twice per week. The most popular way to do this is with the Westside Barbell training program.

You have one “heavy” deadlift workout per week and one “speed” deadlift workout per week.

This is the exact strategy that Cailer Woolam used when he deadlift an Earth-shattering 950 pounds in the 220 pound weight class. Check it out:

What an incredible lift! 

Training the deadlift twice per week is a great strategy but it is not the only way to build a world-class deadlift. The truth is most of the strongest deadlifters in the world train the deadlift once per week.

Some of these athletes train the deadlift heavy every single week. Others alternate between a heavy week and a speed week.

This gives their bodies a little more rest between heavy workouts and helps to prevent overtraining.

Actually this is the exact strategy that Eddie Hall used when he performed his world-record 1,102 pound deadlift. Check it out:

Eddie Hall can’t be human. He has to be a hybrid between an alien and a silverback gorilla! 

The last option is to train the deadlift once every 2 weeks. This is sometimes called “The Lilliebridge Method” and it works extremely well for certain individuals.

The world-class powerlifters Eric Lilliebridge and Stan Efferding popularized this deadlift training strategy and now many of the world’s strongest powerlifters train this way.

Here is Stan Efferding deadlifting 837 pounds in competition to break the all-time raw powerlifting world record for the 275 pound weight class:

Not bad for a bodybuilder! 

The bottom line is there is no such thing as the perfect deadlift training frequency.

The world’s strongest athletes have gotten great results training the deadlift anywhere from twice per week to once every two weeks. The important thing is to find the frequency that works for YOU!

I hope you found this overview helpful. Now let’s take a closer look at how some of the world’s strongest deadlifters design their training programs.

Part 1: Deadlift Twice Per Week

One of the most popular deadlift training strategies is to train the deadlift twice per week. Most powerlifters who use this strategy will perform heavy deadlifts on one day and speed deadlifts on the other day.

The speed deadlifts give you a chance to practice the deadlift and build strength without overtraining your central nervous system.

This is the exact approach that the Westside Barbell powerlifting team uses and it is a great way to train.

The Westside Barbell powerlifting team trains 4 days per week using an upper / lower split. Check it out:

The Westside Barbell Training Split

  • Sunday: Dynamic Effort Bench Press
  • Monday: Max Effort Squat / Deadlift
  • Wednesday: Max Effort Bench Press
  • Friday: Dynamic Effort Squat / Deadlift

The Westside team trains the deadlift twice per week on Monday and Friday.

Monday is their heavy deadlift day where they work up to a 1-rep max on the deadlift or some other special exercise. Then on Friday they perform 6-10 sets of speed deadlifts or speed rack deadlifts. Check it out:

The Westside Barbell Squat / Deadlift Training Program

  • Monday: Work up to a 1-rep max on a special exercise for the deadlift
  • Friday: Perform 6-10 sets of speed squats, then 6-10 sets of speed deadlifts

Louie Simmons says that alternating back and forth between “heavy” days and “speed days” is one of the best ways to train.

You get all the benefits of higher-frequency training and you get to build maximal strength and explosive strength at the same time.

On Monday the Westside team performs all kinds of special exercises for the deadlift. They change the special exercise every single week to avoid training plateaus and to attack their weaknesses.

Here is what a typical max effort squat / deadlift workout looks like:

The Westside Barbell Max Effort Squat / Deadlift Workout

  • Exercise #1: Max effort squat / deadlift / good morning
  • Exercise #2: Posterior chain accessory exercise
  • Exercise #3: Posterior chain accessory exercise
  • Exercise #4: Posterior chain accessory exercise

The Westside Barbell powerlifting team starts the workout by working up to a 1-rep max on a special exercise for the squat or deadlift. They out on a deadlift variation most of the time but he also performs squats and good mornings.

After the max effort exercise the Westside team performs 2-4 accessory exercises for their hamstrings and lower back.

Some of their favorites are the reverse hyperextension machine, the back attack machine, the inverse leg curl machine and the belt squat machine.

One of their favorite max effort exercises for the deadlift is the rack pull. Check it out:

Westside Rack Pulls

The rack pull can be performed anywhere from just above the ground to just above your knees.

Louie Simmons likes rack pulls because they are a little easier on your lower back than regular deadlifts. They also give you the chance to overload your body with an ultra-heavy weight.

The legendary powerlifter Chuck Vogelpohl used to perform rack pulls with over 1,000 pounds! He said that the rack pulls taught him how to strain against heavy weights.

Another one of Louie’s favorite deadlift special exercises is the deficit deadlift. Check it out:

Westside Deficit Deadlifts

The deficit deadlift is performed with you standing on a platform 1-4 inches high. The deficit deadlift increases the range of motion of the exercise which can be very helpful for improving your strength off the ground.

After the max effort exercise the Westside team would perform their 2-4 posterior chain accessory exercises.

On Friday the Westside team performs a speed workout for the squat and deadlift. They perform 6-10 sets of speed squats and then 6-10 sets of speed deadlifts.

Louie Simmons believes that the speed deadlifts are essential for building a world class deadlift. He actually uses 2 different types of speed deadlifts in his training:

Westside Barbell Speed Deadlift Options

  • Option #1: 6-10 sets of speed deadlifts against bands
  • Option #2: 6-10 sets of speed rack deadlifts against bands

Louie says that speed deadlifts and speed rack deadlifts are both effective for building the deadlift.

He likes to use one of these options for 3 weeks at a time and then switch to the other one for another 3 weeks.

Here is what the speed deadlifts look like:

Westside Speed Deadlifts

Louie Simmons says that if you want optimal results then you must use band tension on your speed deadlifts. The bands pull the bar down to the ground faster than the speed of gravity and force you to accelerate the bar all the way to lockout.

If you get lazy and stop accelerating the bar then the bands will pull you right back down to the ground!

Louie Simmons likes to perform 6-10 sets of singles for his speed deadlifts. Another option that Louie Simmons really likes is the speed rack deadlift against bands. Check it out:

Westside Speed Rack Deadlifts

Louie Simmons likes to perform this exercise with quadrupled mini bands or quadrupled monster mini bands. This produces anywhere from 220 to 280 pounds of band tension in the top position!

The Westside Barbell powerlifting team likes to perform 6-10 sets of 3 reps for their speed rack deadlifts.

Louie Simmons says the extra reps are helpful for building work capacity and muscular hypertrophy in all the important deadlifting muscles.

The bottom line is training the deadlift twice per week is an awesome training strategy. Many of the world’s strongest powerlifters and strongman competitors have gotten their best results training this way.

If you want to use a high-frequency deadlift program then I strongly recommend you model your training after the Westside Barbell powerlifting team.

Alternating between a heavy deadlift workout and a speed deadlift workout each week is a great way to train.

Part 2: Deadlift Once Per Week

Now we’re getting to the good stuff!

The truth is most of the strongest deadlifters in the world train the deadlift once every 7 days. This is the exact strategy that Eddie Hall and Hafthor Bjornsson used to deadlift over 1,100 pounds!

There are two main ways to structure a deadlift program where you train the deadlift once per week:

How To Train The Deadlift Once Per Week

  • Option #1: Train the deadlift heavy each week
  • Option #2: Train the deadlift heavy every other week 

Let’s take a closer look at both of these options.

Option #1: Train The Deadlift Heavy Each Week

The first option is to perform 1 heavy deadlift workout each week. Many powerlifters and strongman competitors will have 2 lower body workouts per week: one for the squat and one of the deadlift.

This strategy works extremely well if you can recover from 2 heavy lower body workouts each week.

Actually this is the exact strategy that Hafthor Bjornsson used when he trained to break Eddie Hall’s all-time deadlift world record. Here was Hafthor’s exact deadlift peaking cycle:

Hafthor Bjornsson 500 KG Deadlift Training Cycle

  • Week #1: 3 sets of 8 reps @ 530 pounds
  • Week #2: 3 sets of 8 reps @ 595 pounds
  • Week #3: 2 sets of 4 reps @ 660 pounds
  • Week #4: 3 sets of 4 reps @ 710 pounds
  • Week #5: 3 sets of 4 reps @ 765 pounds
  • Week #6: 2 sets of 2 reps @ 820 pounds
  • Week #7: 2 sets of 2 reps @ 865 pounds
  • Week #8: 1 sets of 2 reps @ 955 pounds
  • Week #9: 1 sets of 2 reps @ 1001 pounds
  • Week #10: 3 sets of 3 reps @ 705 pounds
  • Week #11: 1 sets of 2 reps @ 1,056 pounds
  • Week #12: 1 set of 1 reps @ 1,105 pounds

And here is the video for Hafthor’s incredible 1,105 pound deadlift:

Hafthor Bjornsson uses a very simple linear periodization deadlift program. He starts his deadlift cycle 12 weeks out from his competition.

On the first week he performs 3 sets of 8 reps at about 50% of his projected 1-rep max. Each week he increases the weight and lowers the reps.

By the end of the 12-week program he is lifting over 1,100 pounds for a single!

Many other athletes such as Ed Coan have used a similar strategy to peak their deadlift. This approach works great if you have above-average recovery ability.

Another option is to use the Josh Bryant deadlift program.

Josh likes to organize his powerlifters’ deadlift training cycles into 4 week blocks. He has them train heavy for 3 weeks in a row and then perform a deload workout on the 4th week. For example:

Josh Bryant’s Deadlift Peaking Program

Training Block #1

  • Week #1: Triples
  • Week #2: Triples
  • Week #3: Triples
  • Week #4: (Deload)

Training Block #2

  • Week #5: Doubles
  • Week #6: Doubles
  • Week #7: Doubles
  • Week #8: (Deload)

Training Block #3

  • Week #9: Singles
  • Week #10: Singles 
  • Week #11: Singles
  • Week #12: (Deload)
  • Week #13: Competition Week!

Josh usually has his clients perform 3 weeks of heavy triples, then 3 weeks of heavy double and finally 3 weeks of heavy singles.

The deload workouts are used to help his clients recover from the prior 3 weeks of heavy training and to prevent overtraining.

Josh still has his clients train the deadlift on the deload weeks. However, instead of training at 80-100% of their 1-rep max they are performing all of their sets at 60-70% of their 1-rep max.

This is a great way to get the benefits of training the deadlift heavy each week while still making sure you can recover from your workouts.

Josh likes his athletes to perform 1 heavy set of deadlifts, 3-10 sets of speed deadlifts and several accessory exercises on their heavy deadlift workouts.

Here is a heavy deadlift workout that the bodybuilder Johnnie Jackson performed while working with Josh Bryant. Check it out:

Week #1: Johnnie Jackson’s Deadlift Workout

  • Exercise #1: Conventional deadlift**, 1 set of 3 reps
  • Exercise #2: Speed deadlift***, 8 sets of 3 reps
  • Exercise #3: Deficit deadlift, 2 sets of 3 reps
  • Exercise #4: Cable pull through, 3 sets of 12 reps
  • Exercise #5: Lying leg curls, 3 sets of 6 reps
  • Exercise #6: Suitcase deadlift, 3 sets of 3 reps
  • Exercise #7: Pull ups (wide / neutral grip), 3 set of 8 reps

**Performed with 75% of your projected 1-rep max

***Performed with 60% of your projected 1-rep max

Here is the training video for this workout:

Josh Bryant likes to use heavy deadlifts and speed deadlifts in the same workout. This is one of the reasons his clients can train the deadlift heavy each week without overtraining.

If you are looking for a great way to build your deadlift then the Josh Bryant deadlift program is a great option.

Option #3: The Eddie Hall Deadlift Program

Many of the world’s strongest athletes get their best results performing a heavy deadlift workout once every 2 weeks.

This is the exact strategy that the World’s Strongest Man Eddie Hall used to deadlift an unbelievable 1,102 pounds. Check it out:

Eddie Hall is so strong that he needs a full 2 weeks to recover in between heavy deadlift workouts.

Instead of waiting a full 2 weeks between deadlift workouts he actually rotates between a heavy deadlift workout and a speed deadlift workout each week. Check it out:

Eddie Hall’s Deadlift Program

  • Week #1: Heavy Deadlift (1-3 sets of 1-10 reps)
  • Week #2: Speed Deadlifts (8 sets of 2 reps)

This is a very creative way to train the deadlift! The heavy weeks help you get stronger while the speed weeks let you practice your deadlift technique and build starting strength off the floor.

Here is the exact training cycle that Eddie Hall used to deadlift 1,102 pounds. Check it out:

Eddie Hall’s 500 KG Training Cycle

  • Week #1: 3 sets of 10 reps @ 65% (heavy week)
  • Week #2: 3 sets of 8 reps @ 70% (heavy week)
  • Week #3: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 60% (speed reps)
  • Week #4: 3 sets of 5 reps @ 75% (heavy week)
  • Week #5: 8 sets of 2 reps @ 60% (speed reps)
  • Week #6: 3 sets of 3 reps @ 80% (heavy week)
  • Week #7: 3 sets of 1 reps @ 90% (heavy week)
  • Week #8: Deload week = recover work only
  • Week #9: 3 sets of 1 reps @ 85%, 93% and 100%!

Eddie Hall designs his deadlift peaking cycles in a similar way to Hafthor Bjornsson. He starts his training cycle with some heavy sets of 8-10 reps and slowly increases the weight and decreases the reps as he gets closer to his competition.

He never uses more than 60% of his 1-rep max for his speed sets but goes as high as 90%+ for his heavy weeks.

Here is what Eddie Hall’s usual deadlift workouts look like. Check it out:

Eddie Hall Deadlift Routine

  • Exercise #1: Heavy deadlift or speed deadlift, 1-8 sets of 1-10 reps
  • Exercise #2: Lat pulldowns (wide / pronated grip), 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Exercise #3: Hammer strength pulldown, 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Exercise #4: Seated cable rows, 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Exercise #5: Machine chest supported row, 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps

Here is a great video of Eddie Hall performing some heavy deadlifts in training. Check it out:

Eddie Hall likes to perform all of his upper back assistance work on his deadlift day so he probably followed up this heavy set of deadlifts with lots of heavy rows and lat pulldowns. 

Option #4: The Brian Shaw Deadlift Program

Brian Shaw is one of my favorite athletes in the world. He is an extremely creative individual and he is always looking for new ways to take his training to the next level.

Brian Shaw also likes to alternate a heavy deadlift workout with a speed deadlift workout each week. Check it out:

Brian Shaw’s Deadlift Program

  • Week #1: Heavy Deadlift (1-3 sets of 1-5 reps)
  • Week #2: Speed Deadlifts (8 sets of 2 reps)

At first this looks just like Eddie Hall’s deadlift program. However, when you study Brian Shaw’s workouts you realize he uses some absolutely crazy strategies on his heavy weeks.

Brain Shaw almost trains his deadlift like the Westside Barbell powerlifting team. He likes to rotate through different deadlift variations each week to drive up his deadlift and he trains pretty heavy year-round.

It is rare to see Brian pulling less than 800 pounds in one of his heavy deadlift workouts!

Here is one example of Brian’s heavy deadlift workouts. Check it out:

Brian Shaw’s Isometric Deadlift Workout

  • Exercise #1: Conventional deadlift, 3 sets of 2 reps**
  • Exercise #2: Trap bar deadlift, 3 sets of 4-6 reps
  • Exercise #3: Seated cable row (alternating arms), 3 sets of 8-12 reps

**Brian performs a 2-second isometric pause at mid-shin height with his training partner adding extra manual resistance with a pulley system before finishing the rep. See the video for more details.

Here is the training video for this workout:

I don’t even know how to describe Brian’s crazy deadlift variation and I do this for a living!

Brian performs a 2-second isometric pause with the bar around mid-shin height. However, instead of just holding the weight there his training partner adds extra manual resistance with a cable pulley system.

After the 2 seconds are up Brian’s partner lets go and Brian finishes the rep as explosively as possible.

After the heavy isometric deadlifts Brian Shaw performs some trap bar deadlifts and seated cable rows. Brian says this workout was designed to build his strength off the floor and to challenge his body with a novel training stimulus.

When Brian gets closer to his strongman competitions he likes to lift extremely heavy on his heavy deadlift weeks.

One of Brian’s favorite strategies is to perform band deadlifts to overload his lockout strength. Check it out:

Brian Shaw says that there was over 1,150 pounds of tension at the top of the lift!

To recap both Eddie Hall and Brian Shaw get their best results training the deadlift once per week and alternating between heavy weeks and speed weeks.

Eddie Hall uses a simple linear periodization strategy for his heavy weeks where he starts out performing sets of 8-10 reps and slowly drops the reps until he is performing heavy sets of 1-3 reps right before his competition.

Brain Shaw takes a very different approach: he uses a variety of special exercises on his heavy deadlift weeks. These special exercises help Brian attack his weaknesses and prevent him from burning out.

This strategy also lets him train with very heavy weights year-round with less of a need for time off.

If you are serious about building your deadlift then you can’t go wrong with training the exercise once per week.

You can train heavy every week or alternate heavy / speed weeks. Both of these strategies work… the important thing is to figure out what works for you!

Part 3: Deadlift Once Every Two Weeks

What if I told you that some of the world’s strongest athletes only train the deadlift once every 2 weeks? Would you say I’ve lost my marbles? Or maybe that I belong in a psychiatric hospital?

You’re probably right but the truth is deadlifting once every 2 weeks is an incredible way to train!

The “high-frequency zealots” will scoff at this but at the end of the day you can’t argue with results. Many of the best powerlifters in the world have gotten their best results training the deadlift once every 2 weeks. 

Here are 3 deadlift programs you can use with this training frequency:

  • Option #1: The Lilliebridge Method
  • Option #2: The Vogelpohl Method
  • Option #3: The Matt Kroc Program

Now let’s take a closer look at each of these options.

Option #1: The Lilliebridge Method

The Lilliebridge Method is named after Eric Lilliebridge, one of the greatest powerlifters of all time. Eric broke the all-time powerlifting world record total in 2016 and has deadlifted over 900 pounds in competition.

Here is Eric deadlifting over 900 pounds at 23 years old:

What an incredible deadlift! Eric trains the deadlift once every 2 weeks. He actually alternates between a heavy squat workout and a heavy deadlift workout each week. Check it out:

Week #1

  • Wednesday: Heavy Bench Press
  • Saturday: Heavy Deadlift

Week #2

  • Wednesday: Light Bench Press
  • Saturday: Heavy Squat

You read that correctly: Eric only trained twice per week when he broke the all-time powerlifting world record total!

Eric’s central nervous system is so efficient that every deadlift workout takes an enormous toll on his body. The only way that he can recover is by training twice per week and performing the deadlift every other week.

When Eric is training for a powerlifting competition he uses a simple linear periodization program. He slowly increases the weights over 10-12 weeks so that he is lifting his heaviest weights right before the competition.

Here is what Eric’s typical squat / deadlift training cycle looks like:

Eric Lilliebridge’s Squat / Deadlift Training Cycle

  • Week 1: Squat = 1 set of 5 reps @ 85%
  • Week 2: Deadlift = 1 set of 5 reps @ 85%
  • Week 3: Squat = 1 set of 3 reps @ 90%
  • Week 4: Deadlift = 1 set of 3 reps @ 90%
  • Week 5: Squat = 1 set of 2 reps @ 92% 
  • Week 6: Deadlift = 1 set of 2 reps @ 92%
  • Week 7: Squat = 1 set of 1 reps @ 95%
  • Week 8: Deadlift = 1 set of 1 reps @ 95%
  • Week 9: Deload week 
  • Week 10: Competition day!!

Eric worked up to one heavy set of squats or deadlifts and then performed some accessory exercises for his legs and upper back.

Here is what a typical Eric Lilliebridge deadlift workout looks like:

Eric Lilliebridge’s Deadlift Workout

  • Exercise #1: Conventional deadlift, 3 sets of 1 rep
  • Exercise #2: Lat pulldowns, 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Exercise #3: Leg press, 3 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Exercise #4: Lying DB leg curls, 3 sets of 8-12 reps

If you are already deadlifting at least 400-500 pounds then the Eric Lilliebridge deadlift program is a great option. It tends to work well for very strong powerlifters who have a lot of fast-twitch muscle fibers.

It doesn’t work for everyone but for a small percentage of the population it works like magic.

Option #2: The Vogelpohl Method

The Vogelpohl Method is named after Chuck Vogelpohl, one of the greatest powerlifters of all time.

Here is a video of Chuck squatting 1,175 pounds in competition:

What a ridiculous squat! 

Chuck trained at the Westside Barbell powerlifting gym for many years.

At first he trained using the traditional Westside Barbell training program with one heavy squat / deadlift workout and one speed squat / deadlift workout per week.

The problem is Chuck ended up training heavy on both days!

Chuck’s solution was to combine his max effort work and his speed work into one single training day. Here is how Chuck organized his squat / deadlift workouts:

Week #1

  • Monday: Assistance work only
  • Friday: Speed squat, heavy squat

Week #2

  • Monday: Assistance work only
  • Friday: Speed squat, heavy deadlift

Chuck always started his Friday workouts with several sets of speed squats. Then he would work up to a heavy single or double on the squat OR he would max out on some type of deadlift variation.

Here is Chuck describing his deadlift training program:

“Basically, on Friday’s I will squat and will either work up to a heavy weight, sometimes off of a higher box or instead of going heavy on the squat I will pull heavy from the pins.

A lot of what I do is based on how I feel; something I can’t put down on paper.”

Chuck would mix up his deadlift variation every 2 weeks.

He uses variations like the rack pull, deficit deadlift, deadlift against bands and so on. Chuck especially liked to max out on heavy rack pulls or deadlifts with heavy band tension.

Here is a video of the Lexen Xtreme powerlifting team maxing out on deadlifts with a crazy amount of band tension:

Chuck says that these heavy band deadlifts really improve your confidence with heavy weights.

On Monday Chuck performed various assistance exercises for his lower back. Check it out:

“I perform a lot of lat work, low back work on the 45 degree back raise, reverse hyperextensions, back attack, glute ham raises.

I do most of my abdominal work at work or at home. These are not easy workouts though.”

Now let’s look at some of Chuck Vogelpohl’s actual workouts. These workouts were taken from the old Lexen Xtreme training logs at EliteFTS. Check it out:

Chuck Vogelpohl’s Primary Squat / Deadlift Day

  • Exercise #1: Speed box squat with chains, 6 sets of 2 reps
  • Exercise #2: Pin pull against bands (from mid-shin), 3 sets of 1 reps
  • Exercise #3: 45 degree back extension, 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Exercise #4: Reverse hyperextension, 3 sets of 10 reps, 1/0/X/0, 60 seconds rest
  • Exercise #5: Unilateral kneeling hamstring curl, 3 sets of 12 reps

This is a very typical looking squat workout from Chuck Vogelpohl and the Lexen Xtreme powerlifting team.

First they perform several sets of speed box squats with chains. Then they max out on pin pulls with bands to really overload their deadlift strength.

If they were not deadlifting heavy this workout then they would just max out on the box squat with chains after performing their speed sets.

Now let’s look at one of Chuck’s squat / deadlift assistance days. Check it out:

Lexen Xtreme Accessory Squat / Deadlift Day

  • Exercise #1: Good morning with chains, 3 sets of 5 reps
  • Exercise #2: Belt squat (close stance), 3 sets of 8 reps
  • Exercise #3: Belt squat (wide stance), 3 sets of 8 reps
  • Exercise #4: Lying hamstring curls, 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Exercise #5: 45 degree back extension, 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Exercise #6: Static barbell holds, 3 sets of 20 second holds
  • Exercise #7: Forward sled drags, 4 sets of 150 feet

Talk about a high-volume accessory workout!

Actually this was very typical for Chuck Vogelpohl and the Lexen Xtreme powerlifting team. Chuck likes to perform at least 5 exercises for his posterior chain including good mornings, back extensions, reverse hyperextensions and glute ham raises.

Chuck performed the moderately heavy good mornings about 50% of the time. The other 50% of the time he just stuck with basic accessory exercises.

The bottom line is training the deadlift heavy once every 2 weeks is a great way to train. It works extremely well for gifted powerlifters who need lots of time to recover between workouts.

If this describes you then I recommend you try the Lilliebridge Method and the Vogelpohl Method to see which one works best for you!

Conclusion

The deadlift is one of those lifts where optimal training frequency varies enormously from one person to the next.

The Westside Barbell powerlifting team gets their best results training the deadlift twice per week. They have one heavy deadlift workout early in the week and one light deadlift workout later in the week.

Other people like Eric Lilliebridge and Chuck Vogelpohl get their best results training the deadlift once every 2 weeks. These guys are so strong and so explosive that they need more time to rest between heavy workouts.

Finally there is the option to train the deadlift once per week. You can train heavy every single week like Hafthor Bjornsson and Ed Coan or you can alternate heavy weeks and speed weeks like Eddie Hall or Brian Shaw.

You can even train heavy for 3 weeks followed by a deload week like Josh Bryant and many of his powerlifting clients. There are many ways to train the deadlift. The most important thing is to find the program that works for YOU! 

hope this article opened your eyes to the different deadlift training frequencies that you have available to you.

Remember, there is no single best way to train. If you are getting the results that you want then that is all that truly matters.

Here is a quote by the OG Albert Einstein to pump you up even more:

“The measure of intelligence is the ability to change.”

Thank you for reading and I wish you the best of luck on your strength training journey!

Dr. Mike Jansen, PT, DPT

Thanks for checking out my site! My name is Dr. Mike Jansen and I'm the founder of Revolutionary Program Design. If you want to reach your size and strength goals faster then you've come to the right place. My goal is to make RPD the #1 strength training resource available anywhere in the world. So grab a seat, kick back and relax. There's never been a better time to lift weights or to learn the art and science of strength training program design.

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